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Your guide to Solid Wood flooring

Purchasing solid wood flooring means that each board is made from 100% solid wood. While solid wood may be more expensive, it certainly has plenty of advantages. There are plenty of versatile options when it comes to solid wood flooring, including variations in the style of the wood depending on how the wood is cut. The most popular style in the industry is flat-sawn which gives a triangular effect to the grain of the wood, but you may also find rift-sawn solid wood flooring in your search which gives a horizontal finish to the grain.


Why Should I Choose Solid Wood Flooring?

Along with a higher price tag, solid wood flooring is also higher quality than other flooring options. Solid wood flooring is one of the most durable flooring options available, outlasting the most popular alternative flooring option, carpet. Carpets may require frequent cleaning and even replacing, whereas solid wood flooring has the potential to last for years and years without ever having to consider replacement.


Other wood flooring alternatives such as engineered wood or vinyl can attract greater amounts of dust and allergens, whereas real wood flooring will attract much less and is also much less likely to accumulate long lasting damage such as mould!

Which Type of Solid Wood Flooring Should I Choose?

We have a fantastic selection of solid wood flooring at Leader Floors. Choose from a selection of woods including acacia, bamboo, oak and walnut each with unique characteristics and tones to suit your home interiors. Our real wood flooring is available in a variety of flooring grades including Select, Natural and Rustic - and a choice of finishes including brushed, handscraped, lacquered, oiled and stained, so you can completely customise how you’d like your solid wood flooring to look.

How to Lay Solid Wood Flooring

Installing solid wood flooring is fairly straightforward, but there are a couple of considerations to take into account before you begin. Firstly, find out what subfloor you have. If it’s concrete, you can glue the floorboards down, if it’s plywood (including joists or battens) you can nail the floorboards down instead. Make sure that you never install solid wood flooring without fixing it to the floor as it may lift or buckle over time.

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